Scholar Profile - Rhett Corker PDF Print E-mail
Rhett Corker

RHETT CORKER

Men's Health Program Manager at The Movember Foundation

Awarded a scholarship for University of Melbourne's Executive Decision Making and Negotiation, June 2014


What sort of work does your organisation do?

Through the month of Movember, awareness is raised through the power of the moustache, which is equally important as the funds raised for men’s health. The growth of a new moustache prompts a conversation, which in turn generates awareness and educates people on the health issues men face. Awareness and education then prompts people to take action and change behaviour, which is changing and saving lives today.
On average, Australian men die almost five years younger than women. The suicide rate is about four times higher for men than women and more than four men die prematurely each hour from potentially preventable illnesses.
The Movember Foundation is the leading global organization committed to changing the face of men’s health - funding and working with some of the world’s leading men’s health organisations in the areas of prostate cancer, testicular cancer and mental health
.

Describe a typical day's work.

As a part of the Movember Foundation programs team, my role as Men's Health Program Manager entails implementing the Movember Foundation’s accountability strategy for its investments in men’s health programs globally. The Movember Foundation partners with many organisations around the world to develop and deliver programs that change the face of men’s health – ranging from prostate and testicular cancer research and supportive care through to mental health initiatives. My role is to oversee the collection, analysis, reporting and review of programs funded by the Movember Foundation funds.

What were some of the key learnings from the Not-for-Profit Board course?

Reinforcing the understanding that Board directors on not-for-profit Boards should take their governance responsibilities just as seriously as they do on for-profit Boards. Compliance and risk controls need to be adequately funded by the organisation, although such ‘administration costs’ are often seen as unimportant by many; as NFP Board directors we need to educate the market around this, and not apologise for investing in our organisations to ensure best practice in all areas of our operations.

What were some of the key learnings from the Executive Decision Making and Negotiation program?

Good negotiations and negotiators create better outcomes for both parties involved in a negotiation. Rather than thinking about negotiations as a chance to win or lose, or paying less or gaining more - the focus of a negotiation should be to create the most value for each party involved.

How has it impacted / changed / benefited your role and your organisation as a whole?

The Executive Decision Making and Negotiation course provided significant insight into how to lead successful negotiations that create more value for all parties involved. Instead of thinking about a negotiation as ‘splitting the pie’ – I now consider it an opportunity for creating more pie for all parties. The training has provided the basis for pursuing further studies into Negotiation and Executive Decision Making and has increased my confidence in conducting mutually beneficial negotiations in future.

How did you come to be working in the not-for-profit sector?

I initially started in clinical care as a Paramedic and Nurse. After this, I shifted my focus to Public Health and gained experience working on public health initiatives for the World Health Organisation in Geneva. Upon returning to Australia, I was keen to couple my passion for improving men’s health and work for an organization looking to make transformative change on a global scale. With over 800 funded programs in 21 countries and focused on acting as a change agent in the areas of prostate cancer, testicular cancer and men’s mental health - Movember seemed like an obvious choice.

What do you feel is most needed to sustain and build the impact of the not-for-profit sector?

To continue to shift our focus away from the measurement of activity as a measure of success. We should continue to ask the hard questions of ourselves, as a sector. Are we having an impact for the people we are trying to serve, and how do we measure that impact?

Collaborative ventures across government, NGO and the private sector have the potential to have transformative impact.

What is something interesting / unique / unusual about you?

Despite working for a charity focused on facial hair, my own moustache is as thin and sparse as when I was a teenager. However, I believe there is solidarity in a bad moustache – if I see a Mo Bro with a faintly hirsute moustache, we exchange a nod of approval - because I salute a meekly hairy upper lip just as much as a bushy Tom Selleck upper lip.


Click here to read about other ASF scholars.


"We should continue to ask the hard questions of ourselves, as a sector. Are we having an impact for the people we are trying to serve, and how do we measure that impact?"


ABOUT RHETT:

After working as a paramedic and nurse, and on public health initiatives for the World Health Organisation, Rhett turned his eye to men's health by taking up a role with The Movember Foundation. Since then he has held the position of Results Accountability and Performance Manager, and more recently Men's Health Program Manager, implementing the Movember Foundation’s accountability strategy for its investments in men’s health programs globally.

ASF awarded Rhett a scholarship to attend the University of Melbourne's Executive Decision Making and Negotiation course mid-2014. 

ABOUT THE MOVEMBER FOUNDATION:

Annual revenue / size:

Extra Large - more then $25m pa

Segment of NFP sector:

Health; Men's Health

Operating in:

Global organisation (headquarters in Melbourne, VIC)

Website:

http://au.movember.com/